0945.619.628

A half-hour may not seem like a big deal in this era of 24-hour cable news, but in 1963, it revolutionized journalism

(CBS News) NEW YORK — On Sept. 2, 1963, what had been, since 1948, a 15-minute broadcast, anchored first by Douglas Edwards and then Walter Cronkite, doubled to 30 minutes overnight.

A half-hour may not seem like a big deal in this era of 24-hour cable news, but in 1963, 청도출장안마 it revolutionized journalism. It was heralded in the press and even got the attention of the president, who gave Cronkite an exclusive interview for the debut broadcast.

“At his summer White House in Hyannis Port on Massachusetts’ Cape Cod, President Kennedy today talked with this reporter of many things,” Cronkite said on the first 30-minute broadcast.

Including Vietnam. Kennedy’s comments set off a debate that continues today, about what he would have done about the war — if he had lived.

“In the final analysis, it’s their war,” he said. “They’re the ones who have to win it or lose it. We can help them. We can give them equipment. We can send our men out there as advisers. But they have to win it — the people of Vietnam — against the Communists.”

Xin Chào Anh/Chị . Anh/Chị cần hỗ trợ thông tin gì thì chat với em tại đây nha!